Zoology

Zoology

8th Edition | See Newer Edition

By Stephen Miller and John Harley

  • Copyright: 2010

  • Publication Date: September 8, 2009

  • ISBN 10: 0073028207

  • ISBN 13: 9780073028200

Description

x

The 8th edition of Zoology continues to offer students an introductory general zoology text that is manageable in size and adaptable to a variety of course formats. It is a principles-oriented text written for the non-majors or the combined course, presented at the freshman and sophomore level.

Zoology is organized into three parts. Part One covers the common life processes, including cell and tissue structure and function, the genetic basis of evolution, and the evolutionary and ecological principles that unify all life. Part Two is the survey of protists and animals, emphasizing evolutionary and ecological relationships, aspects of animal organization that unite major animal phyla, and animal adaptations. Part Three covers animal form and function using a comparative approach. This approach includes descriptions and full-color artwork that depict evolutionary changes in the structure and function of selected organ systems.

  • Language: English

  • Imprint: WCB/McGraw-Hill

  • Dimension: 9.3 x 11 IN

  • Page Count: 608

Format

x

 

Wholesale

Retail

Connect
Instant access upon product purchase More

Part One: Biological Principles

1. Zoology: An Evolutionary and Ecological Perspective

2. Cells, Tissues, Organs, and Organ Systems of Animals

3. Cell Division and Inheritance

Table of Contents

x

Part One: Biological Principles

1. Zoology: An Evolutionary and Ecological Perspective

2. Cells, Tissues, Organs, and Organ Systems of Animals

3. Cell Division and Inheritance

4. Evolution: History and Evidence

5. Evolution and Gene Frequencies

6. Ecology: Preserving the Animal Kingdom

Part Two: Animal-Like Protists and Animalia

7. Animal Classification, Phylogeny, and Organization

8. Animal-like Protists: The Protozoa

9. Multicellular and Tissue Levels of Organization

10. The Triploblastic, Acoelomate Body Plan

11. Molluscan Success

12. Annelida: The Metameric Body Form

13. The Pseudocoelomate Body Plan: Aschelminthes (Lophotrochozoan and Ecdysozoan Phyla)

14. The Arthropods: Blueprint for Success

15. The Hexapods and Myriapods: Terrestrial Triumphs

16. The Echinoderms

17. Hemichordata and Invertebrate Chordates

18. The Fishes: Vertebrate Success in Water

19. Amphibians: The First Terrestrial Vertebrates

20. Reptiles: Nonavian Diapsid Amniotes

21. Birds: Reptiles by Another name

22. Mammals: Synapsid Amniotes

Part Three: Form and Function: A Comparative Perspective

23. Protection, Support, and Movement

24. Communication I: Nervous and Sensory Systems

25. Communication II: The Endocrine System and Chemical Messages

26. Circulation and Gas Exchange

27. Nutrition and Digestion

28. Temperature and Body Fluid Regulation

29. Reproduction and Development

30. The Chemical Basis of Animal Life

31. Energy and Enzymes: Life’s Driving and Controlling Forces

32. How Animals Harvest Energy Stored in Nutrients

33. Embryology

34. Animal Behavior

New Features

  • Incorporating feedback from current users and reviewers of the text, there has been an overall update of content throughout. The ecological perspective remains at the forefront of the book.
  • In response to reviewer suggestions, pronunciations have been added to the Key Terms list at the end of each chapter as well as the glossary.
  • The most up-to-date phylogenetic evolutionary tree has been added to the front cover of the book. This diagram will allow students immediate and continual reminders of the relationships among the animal phyla they are studying.
  • In response to reviewer suggestions Concept Review questions (with answers) which include both true/false and multiple choice have been added to the end of each chapter.
  • Chapter 8 has been completely rewritten in accordance with the 2005 reclassification of the Eukarya by the International Society of Protistologists. Emphasis is placed on the medically important protists.
  • Chapter 10 includes coverage of two new phyla (1) Acoelomorpha and (2) Cycliophora, one of the most recently described phyla, which contains animals that live only on the mount parts of lobsters.
  • Chapter 15 has been extensively revised, including the addition of examples and photographs. It contains updated information and expanded coverage of insect thermoregulation using the honeybee as an example. Expanded coverage on insect development includes more details on advantages of holometabolous metamorphosis.

Key Features

  • All chapters have been carefully edited. All chapter revisions include minor to substantial changes in wording, artwork, photographs, and content.
  • New “How Do We Know” sections throughout the text offer students insight into how biologists have arrived at conclusions regarding a variety of biological processes.
  • This text features an evolutionary and ecological focus, believing that these perspectives captivate students and are fundamental to understanding the unifying principles of zoology and the remarkable diversity within the animal kingdom. The changes incorporated include more examples that illustrate evolutionary principles.
  • Emphasis on basic concepts at the most accessible level for students with no science background assures understanding by students with a variety of backgrounds.
  • "Wildlife Alert" boxes increase student awareness of the need to preserve animal habitats and species. New information has been added on threatened and endangered species and groups.
  • In response to reviewer suggestions and requests, several chapters that are often treated as optional in courses can be found on the text's website, including: The Chemical Basis of Animal Life / Energy and Enzymes: Life's Driving and Controlling Forces / How Animals Harvest Energy Stored In Nutrients / Embryology.
  • "Evolutionary Insights" boxes have been expanded into Part Three. These boxes describe ideas regarding the evolution of animal organ systems and processes.

Features

x

New Features

  • Incorporating feedback from current users and reviewers of the text, there has been an overall update of content throughout. The ecological perspective remains at the forefront of the book.
  • In response to reviewer suggestions, pronunciations have been added to the Key Terms list at the end of each chapter as well as the glossary.
  • The most up-to-date phylogenetic evolutionary tree has been added to the front cover of the book. This diagram will allow students immediate and continual reminders of the relationships among the animal phyla they are studying.
  • In response to reviewer suggestions Concept Review questions (with answers) which include both true/false and multiple choice have been added to the end of each chapter.
  • Chapter 8 has been completely rewritten in accordance with the 2005 reclassification of the Eukarya by the International Society of Protistologists. Emphasis is placed on the medically important protists.
  • Chapter 10 includes coverage of two new phyla (1) Acoelomorpha and (2) Cycliophora, one of the most recently described phyla, which contains animals that live only on the mount parts of lobsters.
  • Chapter 15 has been extensively revised, including the addition of examples and photographs. It contains updated information and expanded coverage of insect thermoregulation using the honeybee as an example. Expanded coverage on insect development includes more details on advantages of holometabolous metamorphosis.

Key Features

  • All chapters have been carefully edited. All chapter revisions include minor to substantial changes in wording, artwork, photographs, and content.
  • New “How Do We Know” sections throughout the text offer students insight into how biologists have arrived at conclusions regarding a variety of biological processes.
  • This text features an evolutionary and ecological focus, believing that these perspectives captivate students and are fundamental to understanding the unifying principles of zoology and the remarkable diversity within the animal kingdom. The changes incorporated include more examples that illustrate evolutionary principles.
  • Emphasis on basic concepts at the most accessible level for students with no science background assures understanding by students with a variety of backgrounds.
  • "Wildlife Alert" boxes increase student awareness of the need to preserve animal habitats and species. New information has been added on threatened and endangered species and groups.
  • In response to reviewer suggestions and requests, several chapters that are often treated as optional in courses can be found on the text's website, including: The Chemical Basis of Animal Life / Energy and Enzymes: Life's Driving and Controlling Forces / How Animals Harvest Energy Stored In Nutrients / Embryology.
  • "Evolutionary Insights" boxes have been expanded into Part Three. These boxes describe ideas regarding the evolution of animal organ systems and processes.

More

r

About the Authors

Stephen Miller

Stephen Miller currently teaches courses in Zoology, Biology and Invertebrate Zoology at The College of the Ozarks, Lookout Point, MO (Branson). He is also the author of General Zoology Lab Manual, 3e.

John Harley

John Harley teaches Anatomy & Physiology and General Biology at Eastern Kentucky University, Richmond, KY and is also co-author of Prescott/Harley/Klein Microbiology and the ASM Microbial Telecourse Study Guide.