Chemistry

Chemistry

11th Edition

By Raymond Chang and Kenneth Goldsby

  • Copyright: 2013

  • Publication Date: Jan 17 2012

  • ISBN 10: 0073402680

  • ISBN 13: 9780073402680

Description

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Chang's best-selling general chemistry textbook takes a traditional approach and is often considered a student and teacher favorite. The book features a straightforward, clear writing style and proven

Chang's best-selling general chemistry textbook takes a traditional approach and is often considered a student and teacher favorite. The book features a straightforward, clear writing style and proven problem-solving strategies. It continues the tradition of providing a firm foundation in chemical concepts and principles while presenting a broad range of topics in a clear, concise manner.

The tradition of Chemistry has a new addition with co-author, Kenneth Goldsby from Florida State University, adding variations to the 11th edition. The organisation of the chapter order has changed with nuclear chemistry moving up in the chapter order. There is a new problem type - Interpreting, Modeling, and Estimating - fully demonstrating what a real life chemist does on a daily basis. The authors have added over 340 new problems to the book.

  • Language: English

  • Imprint: WCB/McGraw-Hill

  • Dimension: 8 x 10.5

  • Page Count: 1168

New Features

  • 2012-Best Bet Learning Solutions: 1. Take out chapters that they don'tcover, and correlate with correspoding student study guide chapters through CREATE. 2. Custom volumes with or without corresponding study guide chapters. 3. Loose Leaf with corresponding study guide chapters.
  • Review of Concepts--a quick review question or set of questions (sometimes with a visual) to test student understanding of the concept just presented. Many NEW Concepts of Review have been added to the 11th edition.
  • NEW Chemistry in Action boxed essay on Quantum Dots in Chapter 7, Dialysis in Chapter 12, and Pharmacokinetics in Chapter 13. The authors also updated Chemistry in Action boxed essays on White Fat Cells, Brown Fat Cells, and Cure for Obesity in Chapter 6, Buckyballs in Chapter 10, and the Shroud of Turin in Chapter 13.
  • NEW problem type in the end-of-chapter problems–Interpreting, Modeling, and Estimating. The problems were authored to teach the students the art of estimation based upon appropriate assumptions, finding the necessary information, and formulating a plan for solving the problem. In Chapter 1, Section 1.10 the new problem type is describe and a worked example is provided. There are also over 340 new problems in 11e.
  • Specific Chapter Changes:
  • Chapter 1 - NEW Section 1.10 on Real-Word Problem Solving: Information, Assumptions, and Simplifications including Example
  • Chapter 3- Revised Example 3.11 on determining molecular formulas; Revised Section 3.8 on Amounts of Reactants and Products providing a general approach for solving stoichiometry problems; Revised Section 3.9 Limiting Reagents including NEW Example 3.16 showing how synthetic chemists often have to calculate the amount of reagents
  • Chapter 4 - NEW Example 4.4 on writing molecular, ionic, and net ionic equations; Revised Example 4.10
  • Chapter 5 - NEW reference on mass spectrometer as dominant technique for determining molar mass
  • Chapter 6 NEW - change of E to U showing symbol for the change in internal energy
  • Specific Chapter Changes:
  • Chapter 7 - NEW Example 7.6 on quantum mechanics
  • Chapter 8 - NEW graphic showing electrostatic attraction between the nucleus and the valence electrons
  • Chapter 9 - Example 9.11 has expanded explanation on formal charges
  • Chapter 13 - NEW section on Pseudo First-Order Reactions; NEW section on Reaction Half Life
  • Chapter 18 - NEW and expanded coverage on the lithium battery
  • Chapter 19 - Expanded and updated coverage of radioactive decay; Expanded coverage on particle accelerator; NEW content on the Island of Stability
  • Reorganisation of the Table of Contents - nuclear chemistry has moved up in the content order and chemistry in the atmosphere has moved later.
  • Chapter 17: Entropy, Free Energy, and Equilibrium
  • Chapter 18: Electrochemistry
  • Chapter 19: Nuclear Chemistry
  • Chapter 20: Chemistry in the Atmosphere
  • Chapter 21: Metallurgy and the Chemistry of Metals
  • Chapter 22: Nonmetallic Elements and Their Compounds
  • Chapter 23: Transition Metals Chemistry and Coordination Compounds

Key Features

  • An excellent textbook that is concise yet comprehensive and thorough. Chang manages to set itself apart from other textbooks by not overburdening students with unnecessary extraneous information. At the same time it is thorough and clearly describes the simplest concepts.

Format

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Digital

Wholesale

Retail

Print

Wholesale

Retail

Chapter 1: Chemistry: The Study of Change

Chapter 2: Atoms, Molecules, and Ions

Chapter 3: Mass Relationships in Chemical Reactions

Chapter 4: Reactions in Aqueous So

Table of Contents

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Chapter 1: Chemistry: The Study of Change

Chapter 2: Atoms, Molecules, and Ions

Chapter 3: Mass Relationships in Chemical Reactions

Chapter 4: Reactions in Aqueous Solutions

Chapter 5: Gases

Chapter 6: Thermochemistry

Chapter 7: Quantum Theory and the Electronic Structure of Atoms

Chapter 8: Periodic Relationships Among the Elements

Chapter 9: Chemical Bonding I: Basic Concepts

Chapter 10: Chemical Bonding II: Molecular Geometry and Hybridization of Atomic Orbitals

Chapter 11: Intermolecular Forces and Liquids and Solids

Chapter 12: Physical Properties of Solutions

Chapter 13: Chemical Kinetics

Chapter 14: Chemical Equilibrium

Chapter 15: Acids and Bases

Chapter 16: Acid-Base Equilibria and Solubility Equilibria

Chapter 17: Entropy, Free Energy, and Equilibrium

Chapter 18: Electrochemistry

Chapter 19: Nuclear Chemistry

Chapter 20: Chemistry in the Atmosphere

Chapter 21: Metallurgy and the Chemistry of Metals

Chapter 22: Nonmetallic Elements and Their Compounds

Chapter 23: Transition Metals Chemistry and Coordination Compounds

Chapter 24: Organic Chemistry

Chapter 25: Synthetic and Natural Organic Polymers

Appendixes

1 Derivation of the Names of the Elements

2 Units for the Gas Constant

3 Thermodynamic Data at 1 atm and 25 degrees C

4 Mathematical Operations

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About the Authors

Raymond Chang

Raymond Chang received his B.Sc. degree in chemistry from London University, England and his Ph.D. in Chemistry from Yale University. After doing postdoctoral research at Washington University and teaching for a year at Hunter College, he joined the chemistry at Williams College, where he has taught since 1968. Professor Chang has written books on spectroscopy, physical chemistry, and industrial chemistry.

Kenneth Goldsby