Film Art: An Introduction

Film Art: An Introduction

10th Edition

By David Bordwell and Kristin Thompson

  • Copyright: 2013

  • Publication Date: Jul 06 2012

  • ISBN 10: 0073535109

  • ISBN 13: 9780073535104

Description

x

Film is an art form with a language and an aesthetic all its own. Since 1979, David Bordwell and Kristin Thompson's Film Art has been the best-selling and most widely respected i

Film is an art form with a language and an aesthetic all its own. Since 1979, David Bordwell and Kristin Thompson's Film Art has been the best-selling and most widely respected introduction to the analysis of cinema. Taking a skills-centered approach supported by examples from many periods and countries, the authors help students develop a core set of analytical skills that will enrich their understanding of any film, in any genre. In-depth examples deepen students' appreciation for how creative choices by filmmakers affect what viewers experience and how they respond.

Film Art is generously illustrated with more than 1,000 frame enlargements taken directly from completed films, providing concrete illustrations of key concepts. Along with updated examples and expanded coverage of digital filmmaking, the tenth edition also offers Connect for Film Art, a digital solution that includes multimedia tutorials along with web-based assignment and assessment tools.

  • Language: English

  • Imprint: McGraw-Hill College

  • Dimension: 8.5 x 10.8

  • Page Count: 544

New Features

  • Connect for Film Art. New for the tenth edition, Connect for Film Art is a digital solution that includes multimedia tutorials along with web-based assignment and assessment tools. The video tutorials clarify and reinforce key concepts from the text, including lighting, editing, and cinematography; film clips featured in the tutorials come from the Criterion Collection and include Breathless, Ashes and Diamonds, and M. Hulot's Holiday. To help students improve their understanding of key concepts and to develop analytical skills, Connect for Film Art also includes review quizzes, interactive activities, and writing and analysis activities.
  • Updated coverage of topics related to digital filming. New and updated sections include digital production and postproduction, online film distribution, and motion and performance capture.
  • Updated examples and film stills throughout the text. New, illustrated examples in the tenth edition apply key concepts of film form and analysis to relatable content. Examples new to the tenth edition include time schemes and cinematography in Inception, restricted narration in Lebanon, point of view framing in Winter's Bone, the Kuleshov effect in Contagion, parallel characters in Julie & Julia, perceptual subjectivity in sound in The King's Speech, and mis-en-scene in Inglourious Basterds.
  • New “Creative Decision” sections. In-depth examples deepen students' appreciation for how creative choices by filmmakers affect what viewers experience and how they respond. Discussions include camera positioning in The Social Network, editing in The Birds, and overlapping dialogue in The Hunt for Red October.

Key Features

  • Skills-centered approach. The authors strive to help students develop a core set of analytical skills that will deepen their understanding of any film, in any genre. Bordwell and Thompson emphasize the study of complete films, with an approach that examines how a film his created, how an entire film functions, and how the art of film has developed over time.
  • More than 1000 frame enlargements The text is generously illustrated with frame enlargements rather than production stills.
  • A Closer Look boxes examine issues of importance in contemporary cinema, and provide detailed looks at such topics as the use of computer generated imagery (CGI)in The Lord of the Rings, editing in L.A. Confidential, and motifs in The Shining.
  • Author's Blog, Observations on Film Art. In what Roger Ebert calls, “the most knowledgeable blog on the web,” David Bordwell and Kristin Thompson share their ideas and experiences with instructors and students. Throughout the text, “Connect to the Blog” references point to blog entries with relevant ideas, terms, and film examples, connecting ideas in Film Art to the current film scene in an accessible way.
  • Recommendations for DVD supplements. Each chapter includes suggestions for DVD supplements that provide particularly effective resources related to key topics.
  • Online Learning Center. The Online Learning Center provides instructor supplements, including test bank, instructor's manual, and PowerPoint slides.

Format

x

Print

Wholesale

Retail


Part 1 Film Art and Filmmaking

1. Film as Art: Creativity, Technology, and Business


Part 2 Film Form

2. The Significance of Film Form

3. Narrative

Table of Contents

x

Part 1 Film Art and Filmmaking

1. Film as Art: Creativity, Technology, and Business


Part 2 Film Form

2. The Significance of Film Form

3. Narrative Form


Part 3 Film Style

4. The Shot: Mise-en-Scene

5. The Shot: Cinematography

6. The Relation of Shot to Shot: Editing

7. Sound in the Cinema

8. Summary: Style as a Formal System


Part 4 Types of Films

9. Film Genres

10. Documentary, Experimental, and Animated Films


Part 5 Critical Analysis of Films

11. Film Criticism: Sample Analyses

Appendix: Writing a Critical Analysis of a Film


Part 6 Film History

12. Historical Changes in Film Art: Conventions and Choices, Tradition and Trends


Glossary

Credits

Recommended DVD and Blu-Ray Supplements

Index

More

r

About the Authors

David Bordwell

David Bordwell is Jacques Ledoux Professor Emeritus of Film Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He holds a master's degree and a doctorate in film from the University of Iowa. His books include <i>The Films of Carl Theodor Dreyer</i> (University of California Press, 1981), <i>Narration in the Fiction Film</i> (University of Wisconsin Press, 1985), <i>Ozu and the Poetics of Cinema</i> (Princeton University Press, 1988), <i>Making Meaning: Inference and Rhetoric in the Interpretation of Cinema</i> (Harvard University Press, 1989), <i>The Cinema of Eisenstein</i> (Harvard University Press, 1993), <i>On the History of Film Style</i> (Harvard University Press, 1997), <i>Planet Hong Kong: Popular Cinema and the Art of Entertainment</i> (Harvard University Press, 2000), <i>Figures Traced in Light: On Cinematic Staging</i> (University of California Press, 2005), <i>The Way Hollywood Tells It: Story and Style in Modern Movies</i> (University of California Press, 2006), and <i>The Poetics of Cinema</i> (Routledge, 2008). He has won a University Distinguished Teaching Award and was awarded an honorary degree by the University of Copenhagen. His we site is www.davidbordwell.net.

Kristin Thompson

Kristin Thompson is an Honorary Fellow at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She holds a master?s degree in film from the University of Iowa and a doctorate in film from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She has published <i>Eisenstein's Ivan the Terrible: A Neoformalist Analysis</i> (Princeton University Press, 1981), <i>Exporting Entertainment: America in the World Film Market 1907-1934</i> (British Film Institute, 1985), <i>Breaking the Glass Armor: Neoformalist Film Analysis</i> (Princeton University Press, 1988), <i>Wooster Proposes, Jeeves Disposes, or, Le Mot Juste</i> (James H. Heineman, 1992), <i>Storytelling in the New Hollywood: Understanding Classical Narrative Technique</i> (Harvard University Press, 1999), <i>Storytelling in Film and Television</i> (Harvard University Press, 2003), <i>Herr Lubitsch Goes to Hollywood: German and American Film after World War I</i> (Amsterdam University Press, 2005), and <i>The Frodo Franchise: The Lord of the Rings and Modern Hollywood</i> (University of California Press, 2007). She blogs with David at www.davidbordwell.net/blog. She maintains her own blog, The Frodo Franchise, at www.kristinthompson.net/blog. In her spare time she studies Egyptology.